The Chilling Destruction That Affects Us All!


Chilling Destruction

“Take sides! Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.”
Elie Wiesel

It is truly shocking the way man has bludgeoned his way into forests, woodlands and plains, and burned,  pushed or starved the indigenous species out and taken what is rightfully theirs.

Those they have not deprived of food and habitat, they have slaughtered in their multitudes, and used every part of their bodies for supposed medicinal human benefit or food.  Some they have kept for amusement.  Many babies have been stolen from their mothers for the pleasure of heartless, self-serving pet owners and profit-making establishments.

Were these creatures themselves human, these deplorable acts would have been construed as crimes against humanity.  There is something monstrously obscene about trapping an animal in the wild and taking it away from its home.  Rather like kidnapping innocent and defenceless children.  A dreadful crime!

There is something equally repugnant about killing an animal for its offspring, fashion, medicine or the consumption of supposed food delicacies.  An unforgivable transgression!

The rainforests (the homes of innumerable  species) are being destroyed at a truly alarming rate.  The importance of these areas does not need underlining, but the devastation is now so great, the future of this planet looks far from promising.

There has never been a more appropriate time to end this chilling destruction and step up the tracking down and punishing of these irresponsible, ignoble, cold-blooded beings, and the heads of corporations so heavily involved in all of this, before it is all too late. And, with many species, we are already dangerously close to that point. 

We don’t all have to get on a plane and fight these atrocious people and organisations first hand.  We can help by spreading awareness, signing petitions as they arise, and writing to governments and other appropriate authorities.

The animals and their rainforests are going fast.  When they are gone, WE won’t be far behind!

Some articles of interest
Brazil says Amazon deforestation rose 28% in a year

Brazil blames organised crime for rise in deforestation
Forest change mapped by Google Earth

Amazon Destruction: Why is the rainforest being destroyed in Brazil?
TROPICAL RAINFORESTS OF THE WORLD
Deforestation Figures for Selected Countries

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Fast Fact Attack: Endangered Species No. 44 – The Cotton-top Tamarin


Cotton-top tamarin clinging to tree

Photo: William T Hornaday

Description
The cotton-top tamarin was declared endangered in 1973;  and in 1974 it became illegal to export them.  Prior to that, these endearing little monkeys were subjected to years of torment.  Exported to the United States by the tens of thousands, they were used for long-term biomedical research.  Notwithstanding that mass depletion of the species, they were also highly sought after, and taken, by zoos and pet traders.

Closely related to humans, the cotton-top tamarin was found to spontaneously develop a highly prevalent idiopathic colitis resembling human ulcerative colitis.  Four out of five animals died or were euthanised after a disease course of two to ten days.  [1]  Having lost most of my own family to cancer, I never fail to see, and always fully appreciate, the need for a wide range of research. However, this use, or rather misuse, of animals was unforgivable. It’s hard to imagine the horror of it all.  All international trade has long since been banned, but now the species faces other risks  –  again created by man.

The cotton-top tamarin is a New World monkey.  As you can imagine, it’s pretty rare. Tamarins are monomorphic, arboreal and diurnal.  They are instantly recognisable by the long white chine from forehead to shoulders.  They have mutated claws on all digits and only two molars on either side of the jaw.  Startlingly, they weigh no more than a pound. They live in groups ranging from one to nineteen, though the more common size would be three to nine.  They are highly intelligent, with their language showing signs of some grammatical structure.

The cotton-top tamarin has a monogamous breeding system.  Gestation lasts about one hundred and forty days, followed by the birth of twins.  Females produce twice a year.

Habitat
Tropical rainforests, secondary forests and open woodlands; up to altitudes of four hundred metres.
Where
Northwest Colombia
What they eat
Insects, fruit, sap, small birds, lizards, and eggs.
Threats
Deforestation:  Most of its habitat, 98% over the last decade, has been lost to farming, expansion of human settlements and fuel.
Status: Critically Endangered
The cotton-top tamarin  (Saguinus oedipus) is listed on the  IUCN Red List of Endangered Species  as Critically Endangered.  It is also listed on CITES Appendix I.  Various non-profit making organisations are helping in their own way.  Nature reserves have been set up to help maintain populations.  The species has been legally protected in Colombia since 1969.

“Because the heart beats under a covering of hair, of fur, feathers, or wings, it is, for that reason, to be of no account?”
Jean Paul Richter

The Chronicles of King Big Bear Features and Reviews Mungai and the Goa Constrictor


Mungai and the Goa Constrictor banner

Wow – Another 5 star review for Mungai and the Goa Constrictor!

I have just been featured on the fantastic blog of my dear friend, author and artist Christine Corretti.  Not only that, Christine has posted the most amazing 5 star review of Mungai.

Please all go over to her blog and read.  There are loads of other great stuff to see too.  Well worth a visit!

The Chronicles of King Big Bear

Mungai and the Goa Constrictor featured and reviewed on The Chronicles of King Big Bear

Wow, life is good! – ‘Mungai’ has been given yet another 5 stars!


I have just received the most spectacular in-depth review for Mungai and the Goa Constrictor. My heartfelt thanks to the very erudite Jane Whiteoak for taking so much time to write this review. I hope many of you will find the time and the irrepressible urge to read it. 

Select a place..any where in the world and you most probably have heard stories about a pair to be very wary of, like Mungai and the Goa Constrictor! Likely, you’ll have heard them directly, from the innocent victims left strewn aside in their wake. This is a story about nature, reforestation, gold mining, animals both two-legged and four-legged and the most nebulous kind of all… that of the cold and calculating… psychological nature.
Mungai, escapes from a zoo by literally biting the hand that feeds him, to obtain his freedom. Along the way he connects with a self-centered, narcissistic snake named Goa. They instantly mirror and gravitate to the lack of conscience in each other and recognize “possibilities” of a greater future together. They exist in this world only to use everyone that they encounter to their own advantage.
Mungai and the Goa Constrictor - A Children's Book by Amelia E Curzon - book CoverThey formulate a plan to exploit a group of unsuspecting animals, promising great rewards in the future, if the animals do as they request.
Having every faith in the pair, the animals work laboriously constructing tables, chairs and baskets out of wood with the promise of hope and prosperity for their respective families. They listen attentively to Mungai and Goa, as the two speak with authority and are quite erudite in their knowledge of the woodland surroundings and little gold treasures. To doubt their sincerity would be erroneous as the animals would have a falling out with their peers and thus be made to look foolish.
Through manipulation and cajoling the two cause confusion every step of the way. The woodland and jungle animals work together in good faith but they are gullible and unbeknownst to them are being terribly misled. Their gold mining endeavours, are necessary to pay for new equipment, used by humans to work at deforestation!
They’ve all been told by the amoral pair, that the “trees are too old” and need to be chopped down, in order that new ones may be replanted in their place. The animals have no concept that they are working illegally and are actually chopping down their own habitat. The two ring leaders start to show a few cracks in their armour however, when they begin to live in loftier and loftier residences. Each move is scrupulously planned, to be farther away from the ‘workers’ each time and with every move they have obtained, through smooth talk, even greater security.( e.g. wolves acting as security guards).
Finally, a very observant crow, becomes extremely suspicious and tries in vain to alert the diligent trusting foreman, the badger. Of course, the badger doesn’t believe a word that the crow tells him, as he has complete and utter “misplaced” trust in Mungai and Goa.
The book is very engaging as one ponders, if this dubious duo will ever be seen for what and whom, they truly are. Amelia E. Curzon has done us all a huge favour, by shining a spotlight on and enlightening us, to the damage done to our society by these unconscionable and despicable human beings. Her insight into this behaviour and relaying this message, through the depiction of animals is truly remarkable. This is an excellent book that would be advantageous and fascinating to read, for all ages. It is a real page turner and I highly recommend this book to all!

Jane Whiteoak – January 14th 2013

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