Mungai and the Goa Constrictor – 50% of All Proceeds to the Wildlife Conservation Society


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Deforestation is at the worst it has ever been.
More species than ever are disappearing from the planet
and the animals are crying out for our help.

50% of all sale proceeds of Mungai and the Goa Constrictor, from 13th December until 13th January, will be donated to the Wildlife Conservation Society – my Christmas gift to the animals.

The holidays are almost upon us – What better time to gift someone a copy!

Mungai and the Goa Constrictor offers the ideal way to spread awareness of the intentional devastation wreaked on the forest environments by unscrupulous members of society;  those propelled through life by callousness and greed. Those who are so impervious to the effects of deforestation on all who inhabit the earth, only the united strength of the global community can stop their activities.

New cover size 24.09.13

Mungai and the Goa Constrictor is a children’s book best suited to ages 9 to 90. Told through the eyes of animals, it tells of conspiracies hatched to aid the wilful destruction of the rainforests, and the resulting unlikely friendships forged between the various species of the widespread animal kingdom. It’s a story filled with action, adventure, humour, deceit, friendship, tolerance and environmental awareness.

Mungai and the Goa Constrictor has received twenty two wonderful four and five star reviews.

amazon.com     $3.25
amazon.co.uk   £2.04
Paperback   $8.96

Here are some of the things readers are saying:

“Curzon’s “Mungai and the Goa Constrictor” is worthy of being a classic. It is fable, novel, allegory — all in one. “Mungai” is written with intellectual depth: complicated themes and symbols abound in the story…” (Christine Corretti – USA)

“Great, great, great book! Excellent lesson, and almost a vicious-circle type ending, which I find to be uncommon in most books”  (The Halulkos)

“This unique book is a delightful read for all ages that could become a classic and be adapted to a school’s curriculum. The dialogues are witty and entertaining, and the characters are intriguing and well-developed. A provoking and engaging read” (Mina M)

“Amelia E. Curzon has done us all a huge favour, by shining a spotlight on, and enlightening us to, the damage done to our society by these unconscionable and despicable human beings. Her insight into this behaviour and relaying this message, through the depiction of animals is truly remarkable” (Jane Whiteoak – USA)

“What follows is an entertaining round of scheming, duplicity and jostling for position within the group whilst they get up to no good in the no go area of the jungle. A bit like people in politics really, with a similar underlying message” (Murphy Reviews – Zimbabwe)

“I didn’t see the ending coming, that was a surprise……..I think I’d read this again, like most of the endearing children’s classics – that are also made for adults to enjoy” (Mr. “Max” Reviews – USA)

“This ought to be a staple in family homes, schools, and libraries across the globe” (Paul- USA)

Two excerpts from Chapters Twenty-Eight and Six.

The first is where the good animals are in pursuit of one of the escaped villains.

The second is the first meeting between the animal villains and the ‘two-legs’.

Excerpt One
Taken from Chapter Twenty Eight – The Aftermath

Whilst the other apes were trying to swing after him at the same speed, Gerald had an unfortunate accident.

He collided with a rather large, and not very friendly beast that, like Mungai, was of dubious origin. The beast had been asleep in the branches at the time, and was non too pleased by this unwanted intrusion into his dreams. He reared up on his hind legs, delicately balancing himself on the thinnest of branches, and lunged for Gerald.

“He looks like a monkey-meat lover,” thought Gerald, but he was frozen to the spot and could only think of his imminent death, followed by a prestigious military funeral, he hoped, for his few remains.The unidentifiable creature grabbed Gerald by the feet, and swung him round and round above his head, and then hurled him skywards towards the canopy roof, where he became stuck between two branches. He was so far up, the others lost sight of him.

On his own, with no-one to help him, he thought immediately of his ‘military training’ and decided to bring in the ‘vacate the high location’ manoeuvre. This manoeuvre was something only to be used in emergency situations, which he quite rightly deemed this was. He did not have much time, so he started straight away tearing off branches and bits of other vegetation, and weaving them together securely. He kept doing this until he had a large piece, three times his own size. He took one corner in each claw, and let himself fall backwards, down from the top. It was a very crowded tree. The growth from top to bottom was extremely dense. It cannot be said he sailed down from above, more bounced than anything. He bounced and he bounced and he bounced. From one branch to the other…sideways, backwards and forwards. Hanging upside down, he could not see where he was going.  Much to his surprise, he found the jungle floor. It was not a soft landing.

Excerpt Two
Taken from Chapter Six – Mungai’s Furtive Arrangements

The next day Mungai took Goa on a journey. They left the jungle and moved into the forest, and kept going until they arrived at a huge over-ground burrow hidden amongst some trees.

“What ith thith?” asked Goa.

“This,” answered Mungai proudly. “Is a paper mill.”

“What doeth it do?” She asked again.

“It takes the logs, grinds them up, mixes them with water and turns them into pulp. It presses the pulp into sheets and they become paper for the two-legs to use.” Mungai seemed very well-informed. Goa couldn’t grasp it at all.

“Well, well, well,” came a voice from behind them. “Mungai! Loose again! I thought you was gone for good this time, mate.”

”Mungai turned round to greet the voice. Realising it was a two-leg, Goa shot underneath the building in fear.

“Hello, Joe,” said Mungai. “Thought I’d come and see how you’re doing.”

He noticed the pleasant smell of honey and exotic fruits as Mungai got closer to him. Joe liked honey. He was a small scruffy two-leg of indeterminate age. He spoke badly and slouched a lot. His clothes did not fit him properly, nor did he look very clean. Goa was not impressed, and wondered if Joe had inspired Mungai’s description of the two-leg he had pretended to see in the forest. She hissed again, but was ignored by both of them.

“Come inside out of the sun,” invited Joe.

He knew whatever Mungai had planned would probably be against the laws made by the two-legs, and most certainly dangerous to any other creatures involved. He also knew, whatever it was, he would profit well out of it as he had done so many times in the past.

amazon.com     $3.25        amazon.co.uk    £2.04       Paperback   $9.95

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Children’s Book of the Week and Other Book Reviews


Welcome to more of my children’s book reviews. I hope you enjoy my choice of books and the reviews of them. Please don’t forget to scroll down the page and read all of them!

Children’s Book of the Week – Sir Stan the Bogeyman by Stacie Morrell
Available as an eBook $3.13 and in Paperback $8.16

Sir Stan the BogeymanThe age-old story of the bogeyman is one most of us will be very familiar with.  Here, the author weaves a delightful tale, telling us how the bogeyman first became the man he is.  The man, many generations of children know so well and fear so much.  And, how, with a little help from the right source, the misunderstood bogeyman would be able to find his much-needed change in his life.

Sir Stan the Bogeyman is desperate to tell his own story.  Under normal circumstances, few wish to listen to him.  Upon first sight, children either hide under the covers or run away.  But, one little girl, kindly and willingly, sits still long enough to hear what he has to say.  And, by having overcome her fear and doing this, she helps the bogeyman to redeem himself for past misdeeds.

Ms Morrell has written a beautiful, enveloping short story, told in rhyme, which keeps the reader entranced to the end.  The rhyming is mostly excellent, though, I did think it faltered just a tad in places.  This did not, however, detract from my enjoyment of this enchanting little book.

The story is well told and the exceptional illustrations, by Elizabeth Berg, are a joy.  The moral is worthy: take the time to listen to others; open your mind and give them a chance, and your fears of the unknown may well be alleviated.  There is a lesson in the possible consequences of good and bad behaviour subtly woven in, too.

All-in-all this is an original and fun read, which I would not hesitate to recommend to anyone. (5 stars)   
Sir Stan the Bogeyman would be best suited to ages 5 years and upwards. 

Other books I have reviewed

The March of the Toymakers by Julianne Victoria
Available on Amazon as an eBook $3.13 and in Paperback $8.99

The March of the Toymakers coverSanta’s workshop, far away at the North Pole, is suffering from a severe shortage of elves.  With the start of the New Year preparations for the following Christmas getting dangerously close to being underway, Santa is beginning to panic.  Now, as anyone knows, this is entirely the wrong time of year for such a dearth.  Toys need making for all the children in the world to open and enjoy at Christmas next, and without sufficient toy makers there will not be enough toys to go round.  The burden is placed upon Chief Toymaker, Nissa, to solve the problem.

Armed only with some lines of enigmatic verse and a magic sword, and accompanied by his favourite reindeer, Rudolph, Nissa gathers his chosen companions as they ready to embark on their quest to find the Fair Feather Maid.   She is the only one who can  provide the much-needed extra workforce.  Forewarned of the journey’s dangers, the elves set out aware that to save Christmas, not only must they overcome these perils, but, they must meet Santa’s deadline and be back at the North Pole by Midsummer’s Eve.  The fierce opposition, however, is clearly determined not to let them do this.

The March of the Toymakers is an action-filled adventure story involving a whole cornucopia of evil, fabled creatures such as ugly trolls, wailing banshees and gruesome ogres.  Throw in a few secret gates, scary forests and long, blood-curdling battles, and you have the ideal adventure story for children.

This is a very enjoyable book which I would have no hesitation in recommending.  The plot is tight, well-written and contains just enough ‘scare’ to keep children interested without frightening them too much.  This is a perfect Christmas book, but, I wouldn’t describe it as just a book for Christmas.  Although it does focus on the spirit of Christmas giving, and Santa does feature at the beginning and end, it stands up on its own as a tale which can be read at any time of year.

The characters are well-developed and on the whole likeable.  The descriptions of the mythological creatures are clever – not too long, just enough to get the right mental image.  The scenes are depicted in a creative manner, and there is plenty of action, too.

In all, a delightful little fairy tale and lots fun. (5 stars)
The March of the Toymakers would be best suited to ages 5 years and upwards

An Unexpected Adventure by D. X. Dunn
Available on Amazon as an eBook $1.26 and in Paperback $3.75

An Unexpected AdventureAn Unexpected Adventure is the story of two young boys who, having grown up together, are now living hundreds of miles apart.  Christmas is here and Chris is missing his life-long friend Alex.  Bored with the same old round of family activities, Chris goes to his room to check his email for messages.  Just as he hoped, there is one from his dear friend.

Alex is a whiz with computers, in particular interactive computer games, and he has just discovered a new website offering more interaction than usual.   Via his computer, Alex found himself transported to the land of Distania and back.  A land filled with adventure, mystery, magic and dragons, and a young prince who is hard to trust.  Having come this far, he is more than anxious that the cautious Chris comes with him on his next trip.

Unsure of the wisdom of this adventure, and having been told by his mother he has only thirty minutes before leaving the house to visit a relative, Chris reluctantly follows Alex’s online instructions and finds himself on the same journey his friend had taken earlier. Alex travels the same route again.  The two boys meet up for the first time since Alex and his family moved away.  The adventure opens up before them.

An Unexpected Adventure is a sort of good old-fashioned adventure story, brought up-to-date with the introduction of modern technology.  This is a great book with just the right amount of everything.  Action, excitement, not too scary surprises, a few mysterious characters and a non true-to-type dragon.  It is short, well-written and keeps the reader’s attention throughout the whole book.  The scenes are well-described, as are the dragons.  The idea may not be entirely original, but it is very well-executed.  Both boys behave just as you would like innocent ten-year-olds to do; which is very refreshing, to say the least.

The ending of An Unexpected Adventure left me wanting to read more.  So hopefully, the next book, in what I presume must be a series, will be out soon. (5 stars)
An Unexpected Adventure would be best suited to ages 9 to 12 years

Journey to Jazzland by Gia Volterra de Saulnier
Available on Amazon as an eBook $5.20 – In Hardcover $14.36 and in Paperback $8.52

Journey to JazzlandBored with playing the same music over and over again in the same orchestra, and wanting the freedom to play her own music from the heart, Windy Flute makes a huge decision. Having heard of the legendary Jazzland, where instruments are free to ad lib, Windy decides to go there.

But, getting there alone is not an option.  She needs friends, other instruments, to go with her to make her sounds ‘fuller’.  When Windy finds these willing instruments, they team up and head for Jazzland together.

Journey to Jazzland provides an opportunity for children, and adults, to learn a little about jazz and other music.  It is well-written and very readable, and the illustrations by Emily Zierothare are an absolute delight. There are some nice moments when the instruments learn, when finding a bridge they need to cross, that they can only cross it with team work.

Short, sweet and instructive and well deserving of five stars.  (5 Stars)
Journey to Jazzland would be well-suited to any child with an interest in music.

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All my reviews can be found on Amazon and, where possible, Goodreads.

Book Covers with links can also be found on my Pinterest Board – ‘Books I Have Reviewed’

Please note: Authors frequently offer their books at lower prices, and often they are free.  These prices were correct at the time of publishing, but it is worth checking for any changes.

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Yipee! Another Wonderful 5 Star Review for Mungai and the Goa Constrictor


My heartfelt thanks to the fabulous Paul R Hewlett for this fantastic review of Mungai. Paul is a great writer himself, so I am especially moved by his words.

Mungai and the Goa Constrictor - Book CoverAwesome and insightful by Paul (USA)

I loved this book. Mungai is quite a character. An unidentified animal, I believe a little bit of Mungai is in every one of us in some way or another. His tricks and skullduggery are something to behold. I loved the message in this story and I think young and adult readers alike will enjoy it. The setting is vivid, descriptive and great (I am preferential to jungles). The way the jungle animals bonded together along with humans proves that we can coexist and work together. I loved, loved, loved the cover of this book! This ought to be a staple in family homes, schools, and libraries across the globe.

eBook: amazon.com

eBook: amazon.co.uk

Paperback on Createspace

Children’s Book Week Giveaway Hop – WINNERS


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CHILDREN’S BOOK WEEK – MAY 13th to 19th 2013

And… the winners of the three paperback copies of Mungai and the Goa Constrictor are… Ta dah!

Bookaholicholly

Mayla M

Nicole Krutz

Congratulations to all of you 🙂

Please contact me at amelia(dot)curzon(at)gmail(dot)com with your mailing addresses. I look forward to hearing from you.

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Children’s Book of the Week and Other Book Reviews


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Having missed a week over the Christmas holidays, and I hope you all had a most wonderful time, here are my reviews for the start of the New Year. This week’s reviews cover books ranging from ages 2 to 12 years plus, most of which can also be enjoyed by adults. There is a wonderful fantasy adventure, a sweet (belated – but my fault) Christmas tale, a comical look at life from a dog’s point of view and a short rhyming picture book for very young children. Please scroll down to read my reviews of this week’s books.

Children’s Book of the Week: Escape from Hat by Adam Kline and Brian Taylor
Published on Amazon Kindle $3.28 and Hardcover $18.99

I bought this book because I was intrigued by the amount of 5 star reviews it had garnered (63 out of 64 at the last look).  Nothing can be this good, I thought. But wow, was I wrong! I was captivated from the first page. From the cute and the courageous to the mean metal Dimmer-Dammers, from the tribe of pigs led by Kadogo to Gordon, the lovable cave monster who’s afraid of the dark, this is the perfect read.

Escape from HatMy Review 

‘Escape from Hat’ tells the story of a young boy, Cecil Bean, and his faithful and devoted lucky rabbit, Leek, and a black cat called Millikin whose job it is to create misfortune in Cecil’s life. By Millikin’s machinations, Leek is drugged, kidnapped and dropped into an evil and incompetent magician’s hat, inside of which he falls into the depths of Millikin’s dark world of ‘Hat’ from which return seems unlikely. Here Leek meets a fairly mixed bag of good and bad creatures but his patience and kindness sees him through. That, and the never-ending desire to be with his human again to protect him against Millikin’s bad luck. Millikin discovers Leek has survived the other creatures and conditions of Hat, and is now wandering through his space. He vows vengeance upon him and calls on his legions of other black cats to help.  Cecil meanwhile, dogged by constant bad luck since Leek’s disappearance, meets a mysterious old man who proffers an in-depth knowledge of Cecil’s situation and much encouragement to change it. Cecil listens well, makes up his mind and sets out on a quest to find Leek. Both Cecil and Leek experience difficult and frightening times as they go on their respective, and often parallel, journeys. But neither is deterred. In fact, both are driven by the same inner need to be together again.

This is a book about duty, determination and friendship. There is plenty of action and suspense and lots of surprises. The truffle part is hilarious and almost believable. I found I had to keep on reading, wondering what may happen to Leek and his companions next, and where Cecil was, and how soon would he come to the rescue.  That is not to say he does – you will have to read the book to find that out.

The pages are interspersed with both black and white drawings and striking colour plates, of which I much preferred the latter, but that is only my opinion. Both are extremely well executed.

Overall, this is a beautifully written book which is exciting, entertaining and inventive. A book I truly enjoyed reading and would have no hesitation in recommending to anyone over the age of six. It’s an absolute 5 star treat!

Other Books I Have Read and Reviewed This Week

Dart and the Squirrels by Nicole Izmaylov
Published on Amazon Kindle $3.11 and Paperback $6.99

A world-weary old dog lies at the back of his crate in the pound thinking no-one will want to adopt a dog like him. Then along comes the wild Scribe tribe, whose son, with all the panache of a charging rhino, bizarrely decides the animal has exactly the qualities a boy needs in a dog, and chooses him above all the endearing little puppies. He promptly names him D’Artagnan Whirligig Scribe, aka Dart.  Mr Scribe (father) pays the pound, pays the vet for clearance and pays the Happy Sunshine Obedience Fun owner “fifty bucks for a measly three biscuits and a hand on his butt” and off they all go. Then the fun begins.  Dart seems to attract trouble wherever he goes, and he is especially mischievous at Show and Tell when ‘Boy’ takes him to school. But misadventure aside, and despite Dart’s perception of matters being so very far removed from that of his human owners, Dart’s life is pretty good. Until, that is, a tornado comes along and uproots a tree which ends up inside the Scribe’s house.  With it comes the bane of Dart’s life – a squirrel, promptly adopted and named Emilia Vuvuzela Scribe.  Dart finds it difficult to like Emilia.  She gets all the best food, what he thinks are his treats and most of the attention. Although he does manage to steal the treats before she gets close enough to eat them. But he still cannot like her. Then he senses she needs help in an affair of the heart and he changes his opinion of her. She doesn’t seem so bad after all. As a consequence; his romantic side takes over and he quietly plots to make her happy.
Dart is the narrator of the book and, amongst other things, treats us all to his cynical take on pet owners,  and eloquently illustrates how our pets are probably not thinking what we think they are thinking at all.
Dart and the Squirrels is intelligently written and Nicole Izmaylov’s style is quite unique. It’s also lots of fun. But what makes it exceptional is it was written when the author was in middle school. Quite remarkable! For me this is very deserving of 5 stars.

Martin the Christmas Mouse by Jane Whiteoak    
Published on Amazon Kindle $2.07 

I bought this book before Christmas and although we are now a week past the event, I still wanted to read and review it having read another book from the same author, and having enjoyed it immensely.
Martin the Christmas Mouse is a tale about a selfless little mouse who, with his family, occupies a small space in the living room wall in the house of Mr Kingsley, described as a “kind elderly man, who couldn’t see very well without his glasses” and who is entirely oblivious to the existence of Martin, Martin’s parents and Martin’s sister Maria. The myopic Mr Kingsley is also blissfully unaware as to the amount of help he receives from Martin about the house. Martin, it seems, is very fond of the kindly and often forgetful Mr Kingsley. Christmas Eve arrives, and so do the grandchildren of Mr Kingsley, and thanks to Martin, all things are in place and Mr Kingsley has all he needs. But what will Santa bring for Martin and Maria!  Or are mice even remembered at Christmas!
This is a short and very delightful read suitable for children old enough to understand the meaning of Christmas. As with Jane Whiteoak’s ‘Thomas and the Lily Pond’ there is a positive message for the children. This time it is a message about the true spirit of Christmas. All in all, with a sweet protagonist, charming illustrations and an endearing story line, Martin the Christmas Mouse adds up to worthy entertainment. I highly recommend downloading a copy and keeping it for next Christmas. Hopefully, though, this will be in paperback by then. I give Martin the Christmas Mouse 5 stars

Maggie Mouse Gets Lost by Haley Moonspur
Published on Amazon Kindle $1.65

Maggie Mouse Gets Lost is a very short rhyming tale about a little mouse called Maggie who gets lost in the long grass and calls for her mother. Maggie sensibly stays exactly where she is and waits for her mother to find her, giving out a valuable message – when you are lost, stay where you are and you will be found.
Although the images are clearly computer generated, they are adorable and will enchant any small child.  The rhyming text flows almost perfectly and gets the message across well. The book itself, however, is a little too short and I found the print, far too small.  But it is very sweet and enjoyable and I can see it being read over and over again. Nice fun book for toddlers with a great message. I give ‘Maggie Mouse Gets Lost’ 4 stars.

All reviews can be found on Amazon and, where possible, Goodreads.

 

Children’s Book of the Week: Lionel’s Grand Adventure (Lionel and the Golden Rule)


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This week’s choice for Children’s Book of the Week is the delightful read, Lionel’s Grand Adventure (Lionel and the Golden Rule) by Paul R Hewlett. With its well-constructed text and its light touch, it has all the right ingredients for the intended reader; originality, humour, a touch of magic, a likeable hero, and above all a sound lesson in how to treat others. Please read my full review below.

Lionel's Great Adventure - Lionel and the Golden Rule featured Children's Book of the Week on mungaiandthegoaconstrictor.emAbout the Book

Lionel’s Grand Adventure is a beginning chapter book about a twelve-year-old boy who is constantly subjected to ridicule from his mom and older brother. Things change when he makes a seemingly innocent discovery, and the magical, yet unpredictable, Three-Toed Pot-bellied Walbaun takes him on the adventure of a lifetime, with some surprising consequences.

About the Author

Paul R. Hewlett is the author of the Lionel’s Grand Adventure series. Lionel’s Christmas Adventure: Lionel Learns the True Meaning of Christmas is the third book in the series. His debut book, Lionel’s Grand Adventure: Lionel and the Golden Rule, was released in December of 2011, followed by Lionel Turns the Other Cheek in March of 2012. In addition to writing the Lionel’s Grand Adventure books, Paul co-authors a children’s /young adult blog called Sher A. Hart: Writing As Art. Paul is a US Air Force vet who is married and has a “senior” dog named Joe that he and his wife adopted from the local rescue facility. His aim is to increase and foster children’s interest in reading by combining entertainment and values.

 

My Review of Lionel’s Grand Adventure (Lionel and the Golden Rule)

 

Lionel’s Grand Adventure (Lionel and the Golden Rule) is a story about a short, chubby, ill-coordinated twelve year old boy who is often the butt of other’s jokes. Badly treated by his own brother and suffering a mother who constantly yells at him and criticises him, Lionel often looks for peace. Seeking refuge in his new bedroom one day (he and his family have just relocated from the Massachusetts to a small town in Missouri) he discovers what he thinks is a larger than average rabbit’s foot in the closet. He soon finds out the foot has magical powers. He also soon finds out, from the local candy store owner, an old eccentric few take seriously, all about the legend of the Three-toed Pot- bellied Walbauns,  and realises it is not a rabbit’s foot he possesses at all, but a foot of one of the very same creatures.   But will Lionel put this to good use!

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story and particularly liked the magic weaved by the Three-toed Pot-bellied Walbauns, which never quite worked the way it should, but always seemed to achieve the right results.  This book is extremely well-written and very readable and held my attention throughout.  With its well-constructed text and its light touch, it has all the right ingredients for the intended reader; originality, humour, a touch of magic, a likeable hero, and, above all, a sound lesson in how to treat others. ‘Do unto others as you would have them do unto you’ – The Golden Rule.

I think parents could read this aloud to younger children whilst enjoying it themselves, and those old enough to read will have no problem.  Either way, it is an excellent book.

I highly recommend Lionel’s Grand Adventure (Lionel and the Golden Rule) for children aged 5 to adult. I will certainly be reading more of Paul Hewlett’s books myself, in the future.

    Buy on Amazon              Other Books by Paul R Hewlett                Sher A Hart Blogspot

Lionel's Great Adventure - Lionel Turns the Other Cheek featured Children's Book of the Week on mungaiandthegoaconstrictor.em

Lionel's Great Adventure - Lionel and the Golden Rule featured Children's Book of the Week on mungaiandthegoaconstrictor.em

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Also available in paperback

Children’s Book of the Week: Thomas and the Lily Pond by Jane Whiteoak


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I am thrilled to introduce this week’s Children’s Book of the Week, Thomas and the Lily Pond by Jane Whiteoak. With enchanting animal characters, charming illustrations and a fast pace this enjoyable little book shows children how friendship ultimately will triumph over bullying tactics. Please read my review below.

Thomas and the Lily Pond - Book cover: Children's Book Review on Mungai and the Goa Constrictor

About the Book                                                   Thomas and the Lily Pond is a book about bullying for children ages 4-6 yrs. old. A group of animals are living very contentedly in a forest until the arrival of a large outspoken frog, named Bruno. He attempts to manipulate the group through flattery and ultimately directs his insults at a docile, hardworking Turtle named Thomas. The group follow the directive of the bullying frog due to peer pressure, ultimately getting involved in a food heist at night! Bruno’s ultimate goal is to take over the lily pond completely for himself; he is almost successful! Chaos erupts when a huge storm arrives and most of them end up fighting for their lives in the water. Thomas does not hesitate to try and save them.                                                                                                                                About the Author                                                                                                         Jane Whiteoak has worked in media and communications for over thirty years. After her son had completed University, she changed careers, went back to school and became a Montessori teacher. She has always had a great respect and love for children and had started writing books for children, in health related areas, for a Company when she first started working, years ago. Thomas and the Lily Pond is Jane’s first e-book. Martin the Christmas Mouse, will be on Amazon KDP within the next few weeks. It is her second e-book. The illustrator for Jane’s books was a former amateur and pro-boxer. Interestingly, Ray Henderson was also a professional graphic artist and did work in advertising. His father was a professional artist from Kent, England. Jane and Ray collaborate on books together; he has a unique style with  animated animal characters.

My Review of Thomas and the Lily Pond
Thomas the turtle has a life that verges on perfection.  Idyllic home, lots of good things to eat and wonderful friends. Until, that is, the arrival of Bruno; an over-sized, overbearing and overtly Machiavellian frog.
Bruno arrives unannounced at Thomas’ lily pond one day, and with much blandishment and no small amount of  intimidation, manages to draft all the other animals onto his team, with each soon vying for his attention. But sadly, he turns on Thomas, whose friends, eager to stay in Bruno’s good books, and slightly overwhelmed by him, side with Bruno against Thomas and drive him away from the pond he loves so much. Bruno’s motivation is two-fold. He not only wants the pond for himself but he also wants the little animals to do his sneaky bidding. Thomas, he declares, is too ‘pokey’ to be bothered with.
I am pleased to say, Bruno does get his comeuppance and there is a happy ending.
Aside of the well-written narrative, another notable thing about Thomas and the Lily Pond are the illustrations by artist Ray Henderson. Original, colourful and bold, they complement the story beautifully – and there are plenty of them. There are some lovely descriptions by the author of the various animals too, making it easy for children to learn about different species.
At a time when we hear so much about bullying, Jane Whiteoak’s delightful book would be a most appropriate addition to any child’s bookshelf.  But it is not only about bullying – the story is also about friendship and how doing the right thing usually wins through in the end. It is a great little book to read aloud to small children, and I can just see them all cheering in Thomas’ corner. Nobody likes a bully!
Whilst the book is perfectly suited to the age group it is aimed at, I also feel children up to ten or more will enjoy it too.
I highly recommend this book and hope to be able read more of this author’s work soon.

Buy on Amazon    Flurries of Words    Author Page-Amazon    Under The Whiteoak Tree

Thomas and the Lily Pond - sample image- Children's Book Review on Mungai and the Goa Constrictor

GO away Thomas, let our new friend live here on his own.

Thomas and the Lily Pond - sample image - Children's Book Review on Mungai and the Goa Constrictor

They stuffed themselves so much that they could hardly move…

Thomas and the Lily Pond - sample image - Children's Book Review on Mungai and the Goa Constrictor

Everyone returned to the peaceful life they had once known, deep inside the forest.