Children’s Book of the Week and Other Book Reviews


Welcome to more of my children’s book reviews. I hope you enjoy my choice of books and the reviews of them. Please don’t forget to scroll down the page and read all of them!

Children’s Book of the Week – Sir Stan the Bogeyman by Stacie Morrell
Available as an eBook $3.13 and in Paperback $8.16

Sir Stan the BogeymanThe age-old story of the bogeyman is one most of us will be very familiar with.  Here, the author weaves a delightful tale, telling us how the bogeyman first became the man he is.  The man, many generations of children know so well and fear so much.  And, how, with a little help from the right source, the misunderstood bogeyman would be able to find his much-needed change in his life.

Sir Stan the Bogeyman is desperate to tell his own story.  Under normal circumstances, few wish to listen to him.  Upon first sight, children either hide under the covers or run away.  But, one little girl, kindly and willingly, sits still long enough to hear what he has to say.  And, by having overcome her fear and doing this, she helps the bogeyman to redeem himself for past misdeeds.

Ms Morrell has written a beautiful, enveloping short story, told in rhyme, which keeps the reader entranced to the end.  The rhyming is mostly excellent, though, I did think it faltered just a tad in places.  This did not, however, detract from my enjoyment of this enchanting little book.

The story is well told and the exceptional illustrations, by Elizabeth Berg, are a joy.  The moral is worthy: take the time to listen to others; open your mind and give them a chance, and your fears of the unknown may well be alleviated.  There is a lesson in the possible consequences of good and bad behaviour subtly woven in, too.

All-in-all this is an original and fun read, which I would not hesitate to recommend to anyone. (5 stars)   
Sir Stan the Bogeyman would be best suited to ages 5 years and upwards. 

Other books I have reviewed

The March of the Toymakers by Julianne Victoria
Available on Amazon as an eBook $3.13 and in Paperback $8.99

The March of the Toymakers coverSanta’s workshop, far away at the North Pole, is suffering from a severe shortage of elves.  With the start of the New Year preparations for the following Christmas getting dangerously close to being underway, Santa is beginning to panic.  Now, as anyone knows, this is entirely the wrong time of year for such a dearth.  Toys need making for all the children in the world to open and enjoy at Christmas next, and without sufficient toy makers there will not be enough toys to go round.  The burden is placed upon Chief Toymaker, Nissa, to solve the problem.

Armed only with some lines of enigmatic verse and a magic sword, and accompanied by his favourite reindeer, Rudolph, Nissa gathers his chosen companions as they ready to embark on their quest to find the Fair Feather Maid.   She is the only one who can  provide the much-needed extra workforce.  Forewarned of the journey’s dangers, the elves set out aware that to save Christmas, not only must they overcome these perils, but, they must meet Santa’s deadline and be back at the North Pole by Midsummer’s Eve.  The fierce opposition, however, is clearly determined not to let them do this.

The March of the Toymakers is an action-filled adventure story involving a whole cornucopia of evil, fabled creatures such as ugly trolls, wailing banshees and gruesome ogres.  Throw in a few secret gates, scary forests and long, blood-curdling battles, and you have the ideal adventure story for children.

This is a very enjoyable book which I would have no hesitation in recommending.  The plot is tight, well-written and contains just enough ‘scare’ to keep children interested without frightening them too much.  This is a perfect Christmas book, but, I wouldn’t describe it as just a book for Christmas.  Although it does focus on the spirit of Christmas giving, and Santa does feature at the beginning and end, it stands up on its own as a tale which can be read at any time of year.

The characters are well-developed and on the whole likeable.  The descriptions of the mythological creatures are clever – not too long, just enough to get the right mental image.  The scenes are depicted in a creative manner, and there is plenty of action, too.

In all, a delightful little fairy tale and lots fun. (5 stars)
The March of the Toymakers would be best suited to ages 5 years and upwards

An Unexpected Adventure by D. X. Dunn
Available on Amazon as an eBook $1.26 and in Paperback $3.75

An Unexpected AdventureAn Unexpected Adventure is the story of two young boys who, having grown up together, are now living hundreds of miles apart.  Christmas is here and Chris is missing his life-long friend Alex.  Bored with the same old round of family activities, Chris goes to his room to check his email for messages.  Just as he hoped, there is one from his dear friend.

Alex is a whiz with computers, in particular interactive computer games, and he has just discovered a new website offering more interaction than usual.   Via his computer, Alex found himself transported to the land of Distania and back.  A land filled with adventure, mystery, magic and dragons, and a young prince who is hard to trust.  Having come this far, he is more than anxious that the cautious Chris comes with him on his next trip.

Unsure of the wisdom of this adventure, and having been told by his mother he has only thirty minutes before leaving the house to visit a relative, Chris reluctantly follows Alex’s online instructions and finds himself on the same journey his friend had taken earlier. Alex travels the same route again.  The two boys meet up for the first time since Alex and his family moved away.  The adventure opens up before them.

An Unexpected Adventure is a sort of good old-fashioned adventure story, brought up-to-date with the introduction of modern technology.  This is a great book with just the right amount of everything.  Action, excitement, not too scary surprises, a few mysterious characters and a non true-to-type dragon.  It is short, well-written and keeps the reader’s attention throughout the whole book.  The scenes are well-described, as are the dragons.  The idea may not be entirely original, but it is very well-executed.  Both boys behave just as you would like innocent ten-year-olds to do; which is very refreshing, to say the least.

The ending of An Unexpected Adventure left me wanting to read more.  So hopefully, the next book, in what I presume must be a series, will be out soon. (5 stars)
An Unexpected Adventure would be best suited to ages 9 to 12 years

Journey to Jazzland by Gia Volterra de Saulnier
Available on Amazon as an eBook $5.20 – In Hardcover $14.36 and in Paperback $8.52

Journey to JazzlandBored with playing the same music over and over again in the same orchestra, and wanting the freedom to play her own music from the heart, Windy Flute makes a huge decision. Having heard of the legendary Jazzland, where instruments are free to ad lib, Windy decides to go there.

But, getting there alone is not an option.  She needs friends, other instruments, to go with her to make her sounds ‘fuller’.  When Windy finds these willing instruments, they team up and head for Jazzland together.

Journey to Jazzland provides an opportunity for children, and adults, to learn a little about jazz and other music.  It is well-written and very readable, and the illustrations by Emily Zierothare are an absolute delight. There are some nice moments when the instruments learn, when finding a bridge they need to cross, that they can only cross it with team work.

Short, sweet and instructive and well deserving of five stars.  (5 Stars)
Journey to Jazzland would be well-suited to any child with an interest in music.

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All my reviews can be found on Amazon and, where possible, Goodreads.

Book Covers with links can also be found on my Pinterest Board – ‘Books I Have Reviewed’

Please note: Authors frequently offer their books at lower prices, and often they are free.  These prices were correct at the time of publishing, but it is worth checking for any changes.

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Children’s Book of the Week and other Book Reviews


Welcome to more of my children’s book reviews. I hope you enjoy my choice of books and the reviews of them. Please don’t forget to scroll down the page and read all of them!

Children’s Book of the Week – The World According to Humphrey by Betty G. Birney
Available on Amazon as an eBook $4.66 | Paperback $5.39 | Hardcover $12.08 | Audio $17.99

When I first opened this book, I wasn’t expecting anything quite so good. What a wonderful surprise. It’s funny, sometimes moving, very entertaining and filled with the sort of wisdom both children and adults will surely benefit from. A great little book! Please read my full review below.

Thec World According to HumphreyMy Review

Written from Humphrey the hamster’s perspective, The World According to Humphrey tells the story of his ‘liberation’ from a pet store to his life in the classroom, where he resides as a classroom pet in Room 26 at Longfellow School. Humphrey is totally besotted with Ms. Mac, his kind-hearted rescuer, not knowing that her post at the school is only a temporary one. Inevitably the day arrives when she must leave and the dreaded and hostile Mrs Brisbane returns. Unfortunately for Humphrey, the stone-hearted Mrs Brisbane “can’t stand rodents”.

Following the departure of his beloved Ms. Mac, Humphrey is left to go home each weekend with a different child or member of staff, an arrangement which changes his and their lives. Each home he visits is not without its share of problems; a mother cannot speak English, the Head Teacher is unable to command the same respect from his own children as he enjoys at school, the TV in one household is never switched off, and another child’s mother is sick. Humphrey puts his thinking cap on and helps these families to resolve their various issues. Needless to say, he is much-loved by all who meet him and even the ones who don’t take to him straight away are eventually won over. While all this is taking place, Humphrey is slipping in and out of his cage, by opening the “lock-that-doesn’t-lock”, and at the same time managing to get an education.

I really did like this book. The humour is intelligent and innocent. I particularly like the way Humphrey has named the children – after the teacher’s commands – “Repeat-That-Please-Richie”, “Stop-Giggling-Gail” and “Pay-Attention-Art” are just some of them – very clever. This is fast-paced, witty and highly entertaining. Humphrey’s understanding of his human counterparts and their problems is refreshing and insightful, ranging from the emotions of falling in love to the despair of having a sick parent, and being reticent about speaking out in class because of a language barrier. In most cases, as in life, the children’s behaviour in school reflects their situation at home, which here is sensitively dealt with.

This is an extremely enjoyable, well-written book which is loaded with lessons, all subtly woven in. “After all, you can learn a lot about yourself by getting to know another species” being Humphrey’s favourite  dictum. There is also a great deal to be learnt about caring for hamsters. Humphrey himself is adorable, compassionate, perceptive and funny. A great book which I highly recommend. (5 stars)

The World According to Humphrey would be best suited to ages 7 to 9

Other Books I Have Reviewed

There Are No Such Things As Dragons – Or Are There? By V. J. Wells
Available on Amazon as an eBook $3.19 and in Paperback $3.55

Amy and Argyle – There Are No Such Things As Dragons – Or Are ThereAmy, the tale’s protagonist, is eight years old when she is taken by her father to spend the summer with Aunt Morag and Uncle Angus, who live in ‘a real castle’ in Scotland. After arriving at their destination and eating dinner together, Uncle Angus lets slip that there may be a ‘wee dragon’ somewhere in the castle.

This is a captivating story of friendship and trust. Amy learns she can ‘speak dragon’ and how easy it is to form lasting friendships. It carries just the right amount of suspense to keep children on the edge without scaring them too much. The illustrations are delightful, the book is well-written, the descriptions are well-thought out, and it is short enough to keep the interest of all, whether reading or listening.

I enjoyed the storyline and the setting (Scotland being the perfect location, of course, for dragons). The story is quite poignant, since it involves two lonely subjects, and the ending is endearing; as are the characters. I read this to the youngest member of the family who is already asking for more of the same (are there any children who are NOT intrigued by stories of dragons?), so hopefully there will be more of the adventures of Amy and Argyll soon. Highly recommended (5 stars)

There Are No Such Things As Dragons – Or Are There? would be best suited to ages 4 to 7

Magical Stories by Annemarie Nikolaus
Available on Amazon as an eBook $2.96 and in Paperback $4.74

Magical StoriesMagical Stories is a book consisting of four short stories involving magicians, ghosts, animals, doing what is right, Santa Claus and more. Although one or two minor bits suggest English is not the first language of the author, it adds to the charm and I would consider this book intelligently and thoughtfully written. The vocabulary is excellent, though not geared toward the very young child. These are proper ‘fablish’ bedtime stories, like the ones many of us read as children – and many of the ones I read had also been translated into English. The tales are endearing and absorbing, and do indeed feel magical. My favourite was The Christmas Story with its lesson on consumerism and how Christmas has lost its true meaning. Well done to author Annemaria Nikolaus for offering something so utterly enchanting and beguiling, and refreshingly different. (5 stars)

Magical Stories would be best suited to ages 9 years and upwards

The Adventures of Brackenbelly – All in a Day’s Work by Gareth Baker
Available on Amazon as an eBook $1.53 and in Paperback $5.53

The Adventures of Brackenbelly

The much put upon Isomee Hogg-Bottom lives with her despicable uncle at Hogg-Bottom farm. Here she is happily going about her chores one day when a stranger, a legendary uma, arrives on their doorstep in the hope of buying one the uncle’s, again legendary, flying chostri. However, the uma – Brackenbelly, finds the uncle is not willing to sell him a chostri unless he is willing to help him in return. At night things have been happening outside the barn, indicating someone or something may be trying to get to the chostri on the inside of the barn. Whatever is afoot sounds extremely frightening and dangerous and the lazy uncle is not willing to investigate the matter himself. From here the reader is taken into the even darker side of the uncle’s nature and the good and kind side of the uma, as the adventure begins.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is a short chapter book. Each chapter ending is equipped with its own cliffhanger urging the reader to continue. As the story progresses we learn more about Isomee’s relationship with her uncle and just how loathsome he really is (nothing here unsuitable for children – he’s just as mean as they get). We also see how deeply intelligent and compassionate the uma is and watch as his friendship with Isomee develops.

This is very well-written with excellent character descriptions, including the one of the chostri. It’s exciting, original and imaginative. Since this is the only one I have read, I am assuming in the next one we will learn of Isomee’s fate. Highly recommended.(5 stars)

The Adventures of Brackenbelly – All in a Day’s Work would be best suited to ages 10 plus

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All my reviews can be found on Amazon and, where possible, Goodreads.

Book Covers with links can also be found on my Pinterest Board – ‘Books I Have Reviewed’

Please note: Authors frequently offer their books at lower prices, and often they are free.  These prices were correct at the time of publishing, but it is worth checking for price changes.

 

Children’s Book of the Week and other Book Reviews


Welcome to more of my children’s book reviews.  I hope you enjoy my choice of books and the reviews of them. Please don’t forget to scroll down the page and read all of them!

 

Children’s Book of the Week: The Deep and Snowy Wood by Elwyn Tate                Available on Amazon for various Kindle devices $1.99

This is just such a good children’s book. I have been trying to review it for some time, but, unfortunately, it will only download to certain devices and is not yet available in any other format. Now, armed with a Kindle Fire HD, I am delighted to say; I have finally managed to review it. Please read my full review below.

Th Deep Snowy WoodMy Review

The Deep and Snowy Wood is a rhyming book following three animals; a deer, a mole and a squirrel as they run, dig and hop their way, across, under and above the snow in search of… well…something. The question being – where are they going and why? And, only on the last few pages is there any indication of their destination, which I won’t spoil for you.

The rhyming is superior and never loses rhythm, and the illustrations are superb. This is not always so with all children’s books, but here they are perfectly partnered; with both and graphic art and written text flowing seamlessly together. With a tremendous amount of credit to the author, Elwyn Tate, it’s all very professional, which makes such a difference. I love the way all the animals are wrapped in scarves and how the little mole’s underground home looks so cosy and welcoming. There are plenty of other wonderfully depicted animals too, for little ones to point to and identify, and the winter scenes are gorgeous.

Although this book is seasonal, it is one that can be read at any time of year, and no doubt will be read over and over again at the behest of small children. It is now the absolute favourite of the youngest member of my family, aged two and a half, and the first thing she asks for at bedtime. A real must for any small child’s bookshelf and very possibly a future classic. Highly recommended. (5 stars)

The Deep and Snowy Wood would be best suited to ages 2 – 4 years

Other Books I Have Reviewed

A Voice in the NightA Voice in the Night by Ernestine Dail Available on Amazon as an eBook $7.66 and in Paperback $9.99

Three boys find themselves unexpectedly left alone in a log cabin overnight during a fierce storm. The boys are from vastly different backgrounds and have completely different personalities. Yet they are close friends. There are Brian and Josh, who come from loving, supporting homes, have more or less all they need and our diligent scholars who lead blameless lives ; and then there is Thomas, whose background is very far removed from that of his two friends. No-one is sure if he has any parents at all, and his life is nowhere near as good. He is often in trouble and has managed to earn himself a bad reputation.

Whilst Brian restlessly occupies the sofa downstairs (Josh and Thomas are asleep upstairs in the loft) there is a loud banging on the cabin door followed by a voice screaming: “Open the door! – Open the door, now!”

Brian’s thoughts drift back to a man he has seen about the town,who doesn’t seem to belong. And, there is also the recent jewel robbery in the same town; as yet unsolved. Could this be the same man and should Brian open the door? And why is everyone blaming Thomas for the robbery?

A Voice in the Night is an engaging short story for young teens. It is well-written and the plot is quite suspenseful. The characters are well-drawn and likeable – even bad boy Thomas. The in-depth background details give the reader the opportunity to get to know all those involved and to empathise with them. And, there are lessons to be learnt about friendship, doing the right thing, not prejudging others and helping those less fortunate.

This is an enjoyable short read (32 pages) and I look forward to reading more of the same from Ernestine Dail in the future. (4 stars)

A Voice in the Night would be best suited to ages 12 years plus

The Bremen Town MusiciansThe Bremen Town Musicians by Juin Bugg Available on Amazon as an eBook $2.90

Jack the donkey, Boon the dog, Kitty the house-cat and Red the rooster are all growing old and have outlived their usefulness to their masters; and are in fear of meeting an untimely death. They travel together, escaping their previous destinies, and go in search of somewhere where they can be useful again and live their lives out naturally. Needless to say, there are few challenges along the way, but these are overcome and the four animals finally find a place in life that suits them.

This is a delightful, and well-written, adaptation of the original from the brothers Grimm. Though there are many such adaptations, I found this one quite appealing. The animals find out, despite being vastly different from each other, that by working together as a team they have increased their own value and are wanted again, and are able to delight others with their collective talents.

There are some great lessons here in respect for one’s elders, teamwork and acceptance of others. Children are introduced to the age factor and can see how the animals, although previously considered to old to work by their former masters, are far wiser now than they ever were before – with age comes wisdom. The teamwork changes their ability to work completely (where alone they were weak – together they are strong) and once more they are able to do so. “Good fortune is with us and I believe that as long as we are working together, we will find our place in this world. We will be valued more that the work we do.” As animals from different species they are able to get along and enjoy each other’s company.

Not all fairy tales from the brothers Grimm are suitable for younger children, but this one certainly is. Sadly, there are no illustrations, which I feel would have really enhanced this book. More especially since there are so many other adaptations available which are filled with colourful images.

A short, but very enjoyable read. (4 stars)

The Bremen Town Musicians would be best suited to ages 6 – 8 years.

A Friend Like AnnabelA Friend like Annabel by Alan Davidson Available on Amazon as an eBook $4.63

This is an anthology comprised of five short vignettes about Alan Davidson’s heroine, Annabel. Annabel is a 13 year old cauldron of creativity, volatility, intelligence, melodrama and kindness. She lives in a very small and dull village and attends a very mediocre school (where, needless to say, she livens things up a bit). On the plus side, she has a very supportive, if eccentric, family, and an enduring best friend called Kate who follows her everywhere, hanging on to her every word.

It is difficult not to like Annabel as we are taken through her various adventures, aided by friend Kate’s narration. She is full of life, caring, funny and often quite wayward, and she doesn’t always seem to care too much for the consequences of her actions – this may not be the best message to send out – but there is also a remarkable sense of honesty about her and an inherent understanding of what is right. She is also generous of thought and does help others a great deal.

The stories in A Friend Like Annabel are original, funny and sometimes touching; my favourite being Annabel and the Duckling. To say they are well-written would be superfluous. In Alan Davidson’s writing, the plots are tight with just enough narrative, and all come full circle. Through careful thought on the author’s part, the reader is given a complete understanding of all the characters, main and secondary, without being overly wordy, filled with clichés or leaving the stories path. Excellent stuff! (5 stars)

A Friend Like Annabel would be best suited to age 12 plus

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All my reviews can be found on Amazon and, where possible, Goodreads.

Book Covers with links can also be found on my Pinterest Board

Please note: Authors frequently offer their books at lower prices, and often they are free.  These prices were correct at the time of publishing, but it is worth checking for price changes.

 

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Children’s Book of the Week and Other Book Reviews


Welcome to more of my children’s book reviews.  As ever, I hope you will enjoy my varied choice of books and the reviews of them. Please don’t forget to scroll down the page and read them all!

Children’s Book of the Week: Giraffes Can’t Dance by Giles Andreae and Guy Parker-Rees
Available on Amazon in Hardcover $13.95 | Paperback $3.38 | Audio $8.99 | Board $6.29

Giraffes Can't Dance

Giraffes Can’t Dance is a great little rhyming book about Gerald, a clumsy Giraffe, who seems to be the only one in the jungle who can’t dance. Every year in Africa, the animals hold a jungle dance. This year, whenever that is, Gerald arrives at the event and the others immediately start laughing at him, knowing of his ineptitude in this field. Feeling “so sad and so alone”, he starts to walk home. On his way he meets a cricket, who helps him to understand that he can dance if only he listens to the right music. Thus, Gerald’s ability to dance improves beyond measure. His fickle friends, upon seeing him spiralling across the jungle floor with his new-found agility, cannot believe their eyes, and suddenly Gerald is the ‘beau’ of the ball.

I absolutely loved this book, as did the youngest member of the family, aged two. The rhyming is superb:

The warthogs started waltzing
And the rhinos rock ‘n’ rolled
The lions danced a tango
Which was elegant and bold.”  –  
Priceless!

The illustrations are detailed, vibrant and great fun; and will undoubtedly hold the attention of those too young to read to themselves.  In fact, it’s the ideal read aloud book anyway; being just the right length. And then there is the nice little touch of having a cricket to find on every page; which provides a certain amount of entertainment in itself. This book shows what it feels like to be different and how, by learning that we only need to “find the right music” to encourage us, things can change – a great message.  

Highly recommended (5 stars)

Giraffes Can’t Dance would be best suited to 2 to 6

Other Books I Have Reviewed

Keeno and Ernest - The Diamond MineThe Adventures of Keeno and Ernest – The Diamond Mine by Maggie van Galen
Available on Amazon  in Hardcover $19.02

This is the second book I have reviewed by Maggie van Galen, and I liked it just as much as the first. The Adventures of Keeno and Ernest – The Diamond Mine is also the second book in the Keeno and Ernest series.

Mother’s Day is approaching and Keeno, the audacious little monkey of the title, is determined to give his mother a wonderful present. He finds a shiny red rock. So far, so good. But then, from high up in the canopy, Keeno spots a cart full of diamonds in the diamond mine below. He devises a plan to get hold one of these, and give it to his mother instead of the rock.

His steadfast and sensible friend, Ernest the elephant, tries to persuade him that this would be stealing, and that his mother would be just as happy with the stone because it is something he has found all by himself.  Rationalising that if he replaces the diamond with the red rock, it would not be stealing – it would be a trade, Keeno makes a plan. Ernest is not convinced, and Keeno secretly implements the plan deciding he will tell him later.  He very swiftly gets into trouble, and it is up to Ernest (whose “always there for him”) to rescue him again.

This is another very sweet and enjoyable story from Maggie van Galen. It is well-written and well-paced, and the characters are adorable. And, with the delightful, bold and vibrant illustrations, painted by hand by Joanna Lundeen, this book is a real gem.

Then there is the lesson about stealing; “If you take something without asking, then it’s stealing and stealing is wrong”. And, when an elephant tells you that; you really should listen! An excellent message, especially for all those dear little two or three years olds we all know and love,  who think everything in the entire universe  has MINE – ALL MINE stamped all over it. There is also an added bonus here of a page of ‘can you find’ at the back, which is fun. 

In all; a very endearing little book which I am thrilled to place on my bookshelf. (5 stars)

The Adventures of Keeno and Ernest – The Diamond Mine would be best suited to ages 4 to 8

Mo The Talking DogMo – The Talking Dog by Michelle Booth
Available on Amazon as an eBook $3.08 and in Paperback $8.81

This is a delightful tale about an abused puppy who is rescued by the son of a somewhat unconventional vet. Henry Ashton, the vet, has been deeply interested in genetic engineering for some time and is hoping to find an animal to place a human voice box in; grown from tissue. When Martin, his son, rescues the puppy from the canal, and they realise the puppy is unable to bark, he becomes the ideal candidate for Henry to ‘help’. I must explain at this point, Henry is no maker of monsters, but genuinely wishes to assist the animal, despite his vested interest. Henry operates and lo; Mo has a voice box. Hence, we have Mo the talking dog. Mo is very carefully taught his words by the family, and picks up quite a few more from Mimic, the family’s African Grey parrot , who also talks, and with whom he watches children’s television. Much of their speech is gleaned from this. Needless to say, the Ashton family’s life begins to take on a whole new meaning; something they all seem to take very much in their stride. And so the adventure begins.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is funny, well put together and the characters are well-rounded and extremely likeable; well, most of them anyway. The plot is tight and clever. It reads just like any good old adventure story, which will have children routing for Mo and Martin as the tale rolls on. It’s very entertaining and in parts keeps you wondering what on earth will happen next. My only disappointment being, the animal abusers should have been dealt with more severely.

This book addresses so many issues; animal abuse, bullying, the ethics of genetic engineering and doing the right thing where others are concerned. All of which are dealt with in an empathic manner. I also loved the way Mo talked, and for those who find him hard to understand, you can find ‘Mo’s Dictionary’ at the back of the book. The book cover confused me a little. It is very sweet, but being so simplistic, I was expecting a story for much younger children. In fact, I was delighted when I found it be a chapter book of some reasonable length.

I can highly recommend this – whether you are a dog lover or not – and can see more than one generation enjoying it. (5 stars)

Mo – The Talking Dog would be best suited to ages 8 to 12 

Robbie's Quest for SeedRobbie’s Quest for Seed by D.C. Rush
Available on Amazon as an eBook $1.51 and in Paperback $6.64

Robbie’s Quest for Seed follows Robbie the Robin and his feathered friends as they leave the comfort and security of the bird bath and feeder they know so well, and fly south for the winter. Their plan is to head for Florida to enjoy the warmer weather and the plentiful supply of seed, bread, pretzels and anything else the kind residents put out on their bird tables.

They set off on their journey with all having a part to play in getting themselves and their young safely to their chosen destination. Having overcome various obstacles and dangers on the way, they finally arrive. But, it is not as they remember and there is little food and much water. They have two choices: stay and wait for the waters to subside or fly west to better pastures. They are now weak and hungry, and decisions must be made.

In Robbie’s Quest for Seed, the birds have created a very fair and democratic society for themselves They form orderly queues to eat and bathe, and share and distribute food according to need. Their lives are well-organised and gracious. Quite Utopian really; where the strength of a good team outweighs the sum of its divisions and all are happy; and things get done well by those who are pleased to do them.

This a wonderful story of true friendship, teamwork and consideration for others. Children can also learn about the migratory habits of birds and their patterns of behaviour. There is a bit of a geography lesson in there too, plus instructions on how to navigate by the stars.

In all: A lovely, well-written and enjoyable book to keep on your child’s bookshelf. (5 stars)

Robbie’s Quest for Seed would be best suited to ages 4 to 10

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All my reviews can be found on Amazon and, where possible, Goodreads.

Book Covers and Buy Links will also be posted on my Pinterest Board

Please note: Authors frequently offer their books at lower prices, and often they are free.  These prices were correct at the time of publishing, but it is worth checking for price changes.

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